Yes, you should major in Rhetoric and Writing

by Ben Sapet

Let’s talk about one of Ball State English’s least understood, but most practical concentrations: rhetoric and writing.

You might have seen some of the writing and rhetoric buzz words like discourse, theory, and even rhetoric itself, and been left scratching your head—and you wouldn’t be alone. I spent my entire first semester and a half as a writing and rhetoric major not really knowing what I had decided to study.

Continue reading

Why Employer Site Visits Are Essential

By: Macy Jo Byerly, Vanessa Haro-Miracle, and Maggie Sutton

Three #bsuenglish students’ take on employer site visits

Macy: Our career center offers a few employer site visits every semester. I’ve gone on two so far—both were jobs that would not necessarily be something that I thought I could do with my English degree: Indianapolis Zoo and Greater Fort Wayne Inc., Ash Brokerage and Cyclone Social. So why did I sign up?

Who doesn’t love going to the zoo? And Fort Wayne is close to my hometown. But just because you don’t THINK a job site would work with your degree doesn’t mean it won’t! At every visit, you have a chance to ask questions. I always lead with I’m an English major and what experience I have, and they usually tell me where I could fit in–which isn’t always where you’d think it would be.

On the most recent visit to Fort Wayne, I went because I was interested in Cyclone Social, a social media marketing agency, which fits well with my skills and experiences.

Maggie: I signed up for the same site visit at the recommendation of my career coach, Eilis Wasserman. She was very excited that we were going to visit Cyclone Social, because it’s young and millennial focused, offering unlimited vacations and an open office plan structure. Continue reading

Audrey Bowers: Founder and Editor in Chief of Brave Voices Magazine

New series: 

What’s a pilgrim soul? Yeats might say that it’s who we really are, not who we pretend to be. We say it’s someone who isn’t afraid to admit they’re searching, a current student who is on a path, but doesn’t know exactly where it will lead. 

By Macy Jo Byerly

unnamed

#Bsuenglish students are doing incredible
things.
Audrey Bowers recently  founded Brave Voices Magazine, a literary and arts magazine that focuses on publishing
creative works related to the human experience. Bowers is a senior creative writing major at Ball State. She is a passionate storyteller, artist, teacher, social media manager, and editor. She loves corgis, children, and succulents. Her work has been published in the
Ball State Daily News, StudyBreaks Magazine, RethinkingKidLit.com, among other publications. She is editor in chief of Brave Voices Magazine.

Continue reading

Jacket Copy: The People Behind #bsuenglish

An Interview with Amanda Kavars

So, what is Jacket Copy?

Well, it’s an immersive learning class, and it’s a marketing internship. It’s about learning the workflow of an organization and working in teams. You don’t just study principles and strategies of communication–you actually apply them in real time.

Continue reading

Good News Oct. 2018: Collaboration Galore!

Faculty News

Prof. Susanna Benko and her colleagues Dr. Emily Hodge and Dr. Serena Salloum completed a project for New America and the International Society for Technology in Education. Along with other researchers, their team contributed to the paper titled “Creating Systems of Sustainability: Four Focus Areas for the Future of PK-12 Open Educational Resources.” Specifically, Benko, Hodge and Salloum’s contribution focused on district and state policies that support the use of OER. You can read the report here!

Drs. Benko, Hodge, and Salloum also recently published a commentary in Teachers College Review titled “Instructional Resources and Teacher Professionalism: The Changing Landscape of Curricular Material Providers in the Digital Age.”  

Continue reading

Jay Coles: Visiting YA Writer at Ball State University

By Rachel Lauve

Novelist and Ball State English Department alum Jay Coles will be visiting Ball State University to read from his work on Thursday, November 8th, 2018 from 7:30-9:30 p.m. in the Arts and Journalism Building (AJ) 225. This event is free and open to the public.

On Thursday, November 8th, Coles will visit ENG 307 (Intro Fiction Workshop) from 2:00-3:15 p.m. in Robert Bell (RB) 361 to discuss his writing and the writing life. This visit is also free and open to the public.

Continue reading

RECOMMENDATION STATION: “TO ALL THE BOYS I’VE LOVED BEFORE” BY JENNY HAN

By: Sophia Lyons 

Last week, Netflix revealed that their original film To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before has become one of their “most viewed original films ever with strong repeat viewing” (Roettgers, 2018). So the movie has taken off, but what about the book it’s based on?

That’s right, there’s a book.

Caution: Spoilers Ahead

Continue reading

5 Ways English Prepares You For A Dream Job

By: Maggie Sutton

You can do almost anything with a degree in English. Our alumni agree. The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) agrees. Even Google agrees. Employers want the skills and experiences English majors have in spades.

So, what do you need to do to prepare for the “real world”?

1.Write Well

Employers want to hire skillful writers. NACE’s second most valued skill was written communication.

English classes help to polish written communication skills, so remember that when you’re buried in essay deadlines!

Continue reading

Write On (Campus)!

By: Grace Goze

As English majors, it’s no secret we love reading, but let’s not forget about our passion for writing. Whether you’re a Creative Writing major or not, it may be hard to find groups on campus that just let you write for the sake of writing. Well, fear not writers, here is a compiled list of some of the big writing organizations on campus!

Writers’ Community

8 PM on Monday in RB 284
writers@bsu.edu or tdmckinney@bsu.edu

The Writers’ Community is a creative writing organization where folks can share and get feedback on their writing. We accept almost any medium of literature in most any genre. Folks have shared short stories, parts of novels, poems, songs, and much more.

“The organization is beneficial to students interested in writing, because we offer feedback and advice on shared works and creative writing in general. Students are free to share and discuss their ideas, plans, current works, etc. I encourage anyone who writes or who is interested in writing to come on down to a meeting and check it out.” — Ian Roesler

To find out more, check out our blog post specifically on Writers’ Community.  Writers’ Community can also be found on Twitter.

Continue reading

Christina Dionesotes: (Not) Lost in Translation

Christina Dionesotes graduated from Ball State with degrees in both English Studies and Spanish. She then went to New York University for her Masters in Spanish and Latin American Cultural, Literary, and Linguistic Studies. Since then, she has worked as a freelancer translator editor and proofreader, and is now the Associate Project Manager at RWS Life Sciences.

What was your first job after graduation, and how did that lead you to your current position?

After graduation, I went right into graduate school in Spain. Because I didn’t have a work visa and was in school full time, my work options were limited. I ended up nannying/teaching English to two young girls to supplement my loan money. I also started getting into freelance editing and translation. After grad school, I came home to Chicago and looking for jobs that were related to language or included Spanish. I found my current job, under “Linguistic Validation Project Manager” quickly. I had no clue what that position entailed, didn’t know anyone at the company, but managed to score an interview. I have been working here for about 2 years now and can’t believe how much I’ve learned about the translation industry through this job.

What does a typical week look like for you?

I currently work as a contractor for my full-time job which means I’m working from home full time. I tend to go to coffee shops a few days a week just to get out of the house. What I love is that my job allows for the perfect balance of collaborating with coworkers and plugging in music and being in “do not disturb mode”. I have client calls maybe once a day but spend the most of my time working with linguists, proofreading, quality checking translations, collaborating with other vendors, and working to improve internal processes.

Right now, we’re going through quite a busy period so it’s normal to work until 6 PM, take a break, and then log back on around 9 PM or so. Right now I’m working anywhere from 40-60 hours for this job. 

I also maintain my status as a freelance translator. Now that I’m living back in the US, I’m speaking Spanish much less than I want to. Although being a rather inexperienced translator does not pay very well, I still maintain that it’s important and try to pick up a gig 1-2 times a week.

What is the most fulfilling part of your job?

The most fulfilling part of my job is getting to work with languages every day. This is what I loved to study in school, so to be paid to ask about tense, aspect, and modality is pretty cool.

Even more, I work with language-minded people. All of my colleagues speak at least one other language and the majority of us have lived in different countries and have significant others from other places.

Do you have any advice for English majors who are trying to figure out their next step?

Enjoy the process of figuring it out. I was so afraid of making the “wrong” step at the time of graduation. I just wanted to be able to tell people I was doing SOMETHING. Looking back, it would have served me well to look at all the options (yes, including moving back in with my parents).

I remember looking at jobs at the career fair and almost none of them listing “English major” as a degree that qualified me for that job. Hear me loud and clear: that is bullshit. Don’t pigeonhole yourselves into certain jobs you think you have to do. You can be an English major and not teach!

What are the most valuable skills you learned as an English major? How have they helped you post graduation?

This may be a very basic answer but being an English major taught me to analyze problems and come up with creative solutions. In my job, we’re constantly having to come up with new processes as the technology and industry changes. Sometimes clients come to us with near-impossible requests and ask us to make it happen. It has been so helpful to be able to extract pieces of information, draw conclusions, and make a plan of action based on said conclusions.

In a more “real life” sense, my professors really encouraged me to question things. They taught me to question the norm, to ask why that is the norm and who benefits from that being the norm. That’s probably something I use on an everyday basis with work, relationships, etc.

 

Does this type of career sound interesting to you? Join us at Stars to Steer By on October 23rd to learn more about career opportunities involving languages.