Bryan Lubeck: Fortune 500 Marketer, Professional Musician

Guest post by Charlie Cain

Bryan Lubeck graduated from Ball State University with a major in English in 1989.  He has gone on to hold executive marketing positions with several fortune 500 companies and to a successful career in music.

What drew you to BSU English?

Well I went to Ball State not quite knowing what I wanted to do. I had a music background.  My original plan was to be a singer/dancer, maybe a guitarist. I did come to Ball State with a guitar scholarship, a small one, but my main goal was to be in the University Singers. But then it sort of dawned on me that my classical guitar playing, singing, and music theatre were going nowhere. I thought maybe I would get a business degree and become a producer. Continue reading

Don’t have time to read the book first? You’re in luck.

By Becky Cooper

Johnny Depp. Daisy Ridley. Michelle Pfeiffer. Judi Dench. Penelope Cruz. Kenneth Branaugh. With a cast like this, you know you’ll want to see Murder on the Orient Express.

But you know it was a book first, right? By the best-selling novelist of all time, Agatha Christie.

They say that the book is always better than the movie, but maybe you don’t have time to read it before November 10? Well, you’re in luck, because this review will give you enough of the plot to understand the movie without spoiling the end.

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Author Ira Sukrungruang to Visit Ball State

Author Ira Sukrungruang will be visiting Ball State University on Wednesday, November 15, 2017 at 8:00 p.m., Arts and Journalism Building (AJ) 225, and it is free and open to the public.

Ira will be making two classroom visits to discuss his work in creative nonfiction and poetry. These visits are also free and open to the public.

  • Wednesday, 11/15: Ira visits ENG 613 (Graduate Poetry Workshop), 2:45-4:00, 305 Pittinger
  • Thursday, 11/16: Ira visits ENG 406 (Advanced Creative Nonfiction), 2:00-2:45, 306 Pittenger

Ira Sukrungruang is the author of the memoirs Southside Buddhist and Talk Thai: The Adventures of Buddhist Boy, the short story collection The Melting Season,and the poetry collection In Thailand It Is Night. He is the coeditor of two anthologies on the topic of obesity: What Are You Looking At? The First Fat Fiction Anthology and Scoot Over, Skinny: The Fat Nonfiction Anthology. He is the recipient of the 2015 American Book Award, New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship in Nonfiction Literature, an Arts and Letters Fellowship, and the Emerging Writer Fellowship. His work has appeared in many literary journals, including Post Road, The Sun, and Creative Nonfiction. He is one of the founding editors of Sweet: A Literary Confection (sweetlit.com), and teaches in the MFA program at University of South Florida. For more information about him, please visit: http://www.buddhistboy.com/.

Learn more about him

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5 Albums to Keep You Warm This Fall

By: Corey Halbert

It feels like it’s taken forever, but Fall is finally here. The leaves are changing, the air is getting colder, and pumpkin-flavored drinks are back on the menus. Autumn is a time of change, and a time of reflection, so we’ve gathered five albums to soundtrack it.

The Tallest Man on Earth – The Wild Hunt

Folk – 2010

        Even the album art for this record feels like Fall. The grey clouds, desolate Midwestern landscape, and the grey asphalt in the foreground all remind us of a cool afternoon drive through the countryside. This record by Swedish singer songwriter Kristian Matsson just feels like Fall. The finger picked guitar melodies, the Dylan-esque croon to Matsson’s voice, and the lyrics about change and moving on all make for a perfect fall record.

Best tracks: King of Spain, Love is All, Kids on the Run

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Winners announced at revamped PCM / UES conferences

The Practical Criticism Midwest (PCM) and Undergraduate English Studies (UES) Conferences, October 13, were attended by over 85 students, faculty, and guests. The graduate students have run PCM in the past, but this year, we added the undergraduate student conference to it, and also opened up the conference to participants outside BSU English. We welcomed students from Ivy Tech, Anderson University, and IPFW. Many undergraduate students told us how exciting this experience was, and some told me that they want to present their work next year.

The best presentation awardees were Kathryn Powell (UES), who presented her creative work, “The Listening Horizon,”

Kathryn Powell

and Abdullah Albalawi (PCM), who presented his research, “Gender Differences in The Speech Act of Thanking in Saudi Arabic.”

Abdullah Albalawi

Hannah Bovino, Doggerel contest winner, presented her poem, “I’m sorry iPhone.”

The keynote speakers featured 4 alumni (Leslie Erlenbaugh, Emily Groch, Ashley Mack-Jackson, Aaron Nicely), who shared their experience finding careers with English degrees. The conference ended with the doggerel contest. This year’s winner was Hannah Bovino, who presented her poem, “I’m sorry iPhone.” The conference overall was a fun and educational experience where students, faculty, and alumni could meet and interact. This year’s conference chair was Angela Tomasello (MA Linguistics Student), who led the graduate student volunteers. Prof. Silas Hansen (Conference Faculty Advisor) and Dr. Megumi Hamada (Assistant Chair of Programs) helped organize the conference.

October Good News: Molly Ferguson is elected President and More!

We’ve got a lot of good news this month!

Faculty News

Andrea Wolfe will be presenting a session entitled “Facing International Students: Building Empathy through Storytelling” with Lizz Alezetes and Deborah McMillan, both of the Intensive English Institute at Ball State, at the 2017 INTESOL Conference on November 11th

Molly Ferguson was elected president of the Midwest Regional American Conference for Irish Studies. On October 6th, she presented a paper, “‘To say no and no and no again’: Fasting as Resistance in Emma Donoghue’s The Wonder” at the Midwest ACIS at the University of Missouri.

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4 Ways to Make an Unpaid Internship Work for You

By: Olivia Power

If you work during the school year or in the summer, you probably think you don’t have the time or money for an unpaid internship. Or, you may think that these types of internships are merely a form of exploitation. If you find yourself nodding your head in agreement at this point, this post is for you.

It’s enough to make an English major despair, isn’t it? What’s the point in working without a tangible reward? Or what if working for free is just not a financial possibility? And why are so many unpaid internships the exact kind that English majors want–positions for writers and editors? Are words really this cheap?

But don’t despair, English majors. Unpaid internships can be tricky, but when you find one that strikes the right balance between good experience and low time-commitment, it can end up being well worth your time.

As I read the description for the position of Communications & Marketing intern at Ronald McDonald House Charities of Central Indiana at the end of last semester, my heart began to race. I had been searching for a position exactly like this one for months, one that would suit my interest in nonprofit organizations. But, as their name implies, nonprofits rarely have the luxury of extra cash for paying interns, relying on volunteers and just a few salaried staffers to carry out their mission. When I applied for the internship, I knew I wouldn’t be getting paid, but hoped that I’d gain enough good experience would make up for the spending money I’d be missing out on. I got that and more.

Here are some ways to approach an unpaid internship to make sure you get the most out of your experience, just as I did this past summer.

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Why you should write a novel (and fail) in college

Jalynn is a junior Communication Studies major with an interest in social media, PR, and design. She loves to read YA novels and occasionally writes mediocre fiction – she’s working on the mediocre part.  Want to connect?

by Jalynn Madison

I’ve known I’ve wanted to write since the 5th grade – the same year I fell in love with books. I loved how words on a page could make me feel so many things at once. Sometimes I was sad, surprised, or angry. But no matter what I felt while I was reading, I was always hungry for more by the end. I decided at the age of 10 that I wanted to have a command over words so powerful that I could make people feel the way I always felt when reading a book.

And so began my journey of writing.

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Graham Brown: “Start a business. Change the world.”

The next speaker for the “Stars to Steer By Series” is Graham Brown, owner of United State of Indiana, clothing that helps Hoosiers express a love of Indiana, including the t-shirt that inspired the logo for the “Stars to Steer By Series” itself!

When and where?

Wednesday, November 8 at 6:30 PM in WB (Business Building) 141.

What’s the topic?

“Your Job is to Have Fun: The New Era of Entrepreneurship.”

Entrepreneurship? That’s a business word, not an English word. 

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Register for Book Arts Collaborative!

Looking for another class to add to your schedule for Spring Semester that isn’t just another lecture? We have just the class for you. Book Arts Collaborative is an immersive-learning experience that is also student-managed business.

What do students in Book Arts Collaborative do?

Participants professionalize skills through a variety of hands-on learning and management experiences. They teach letterpress printing and hand-sewn book binding to students, who assist with and eventually lead community workshop instruction in these apprentice-taught skills.

Book Arts Collaborative sells its work through a network of Central Indiana retailers, and students work with those business and gallery owners. They publicize their workshops, community donations and activities such as appearances at street fairs and book arts-related events. Their website also includes a student-written blog.

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