Tag Archives: internships

September Good News: Publishing Frenzy!

Faculty News

Prof. Emily Rutter’s The Blues Muse: Race, Gender, and Musical Celebrity in American Poetry (University of Alabama Press) is now in print! Order it now!

Prof. Deborah Mix’s Approaches to Teaching the Works of Gertrude Stein, co-edited with Logan Esdale of Chapman University, is finally in print! Order it now!

Cover of Prof. Emily Rutter’s newly published book.

Prof. Michael Begnal’s poem “The Traitor’s Flag” was published in Writers Resist issue 71.

Prof. Molly Ferguson’s article, “‘To say no and no and no again’: Fasting girls, Shame, and Storytelling in Emma Donoghue’s The Wonder” was published in the Summer 2018 (vol 22:2) edition of New Hibernia Review.

Prof. Jill Christman had two essays published over the summer: “Naked Underneath Our Clothes” (Creative Nonfiction) &  “Life’s Not a Paragraph”(River Teeth). Spinning: A Love Story (a collection of essays) was a finalist for the 2018 Gournay Prize at The Ohio State University Press. She will be attending the NonfictioNow conference in Phoenix, Arizona next month to present on two panels: “Writing the Day” and “Our True Voice(s).”

Cover of Prof. Deborah Mix’s newly published book.

Prof. Rai Peterson will be the Banned Books Week “prisoner” at the Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library during the last week of September.  While she is incarcerated in the front window of the Library, she will be meeting with visitors of the KVML, blogging on its website, and speaking at her release event on Saturday, September 29.

Prof. Gui Garcia gave a workshop on RMarkdown earlier this month in the Applied Statistics and R group (ASR) at Ball State. The group, which is now led by Dr. Garcia, is resuming its monthly meetings this fall. Look out for future dates and topics. Also earlier this month, Dr. Garcia gave a talk at the Montreal Symposium in honor of Lydia White, who created the field of Second Language Acquisition in the 1980s—and who just retired. Later this month, Dr. Garcia will present two papers at the 8th GALANA (Generative Approaches to Language Acquisition North America), a biennial meeting held at Indiana University (Bloomington) this year. Finally, he has recently published an online tutorial on his website on how to graphically explore vowels using the R language. Continue reading

August Good News

We were really busy over the summer, writing and researching and submitting and job hunting. So we’ve got a lot of good news to share this month!

Faculty News

Prof. Michael Begnal  

  • His article “‘Bullets for Hands’: Witter Bynner, Arthur Davison Ficke, and the Spectra Poems of World War I” was published in Twentieth-Century Literature, vol. 64, no. 2 (June 2018).
  • His article “Modernist Mythologies: The Turquoise Trail Anthology and the Poets of Santa Fe” was published in Western American Literature, vol. 53, no. 2 (Summer 2018).
  • He had five poems (homages to Archie Shepp, Bill Evans, Peggy Pond Church, Leroy Carr, and Richard Realf) published in Penumbra  and another in Smithereens Literary Magazine (Ireland).
  • Additionally, he gave a presentation of poetry at the Sport Literature Association Conference on June 20, 2018, at the University of Kansas in Lawrence, Kansas, titled “Baseball Poems/Baseball Images,” and was interviewed on Bangor, Maine’s AM620 WZON radio on August 8, 2018, and read some poems on the air

Prof. Brent M. Blackwell attended three conferences this year (The Benjamin v. Cohen Peace Conference at Ball State and the Mid-East Honors Association at Central Michigan), the third of which will be the National Collegiate Honors Council Annual Meeting in Boston, MA in November, where he will chair a roundtable discussion on incorporating STEM issues in honors humanities courses.  

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Levi Todd on Interning at The Poetry Center of Chicago

Ball State student Levi Todd recounts the incredible opportunities he had interning at The Poetry Center of Chicago. Levi worked at The Poetry Center, an office located in downtown Chicago, where he served as Social Media and Programming Intern for this organization. 

Like any college student, I’ve gotten pretty familiar with my career elevator speech that I can pull out when returning home, meeting new people, and for general small talk. It sounds like this: “I want to work for a literacy nonprofit that offers creative writing education to youth.” I’ve also gotten pretty familiar with people’s responses to this. Most often it’s a concealed grimace, like they’re holding back from saying “Oh, you poor thing.” Other times it’s people flat-out asking, “So you’re okay with not making any money?”

I’m not sure who started it, but there seems to be a false notion of working in the nonprofit sector. I think most people’s conception of a nonprofit organization is flickering lights in a church basement, where the staff is foregoing their third paycheck so that the children they serve can receive a library. We consider nonprofit workers to be doing good work, but not “successful” by our traditional definitions.

Whenever I meet these cynics, I want to introduce them to the Chicago Literacy Alliance. The CLA is a collective of 90+ nonprofit organizations devoted to various aspects of literacy. The organizations share resources and information to set up a city-wide alliance with the common goal of bettering Chicago’s literacy. Each organization does something different–Infiniteach creates technology that allows businesses and organizations to make their spaces more accessible to those with autism. Injustice Watch exposes institutional injustice and better equips journalists to write about inequality and social change. The organization I interned for, The Poetry Center of Chicago, gets public school students reading and writing poetry, and creates paid professional opportunities for Chicago poets.

Keep on Reading!

Paid Internships Available At Midwest Writers Workshop 2015

Every summer, Ball State hosts agents, authors, editors, and other publishing specialists at the annual Midwest Writer’s Workshop (MWW). The workshop is held from July 23-25, just three short days, and you (yes, we mean you) can play a big part in its success!

For current students in English, including the graduating class of 2015, MWW has eight paid internship opportunities. You’ll gain valuable experience, a great line on your resume, and a chance to network in your field.

Did we mention it’s paid?

Some extra summer spending money never hurt anyone, right?

Let’s sum it up so far:

  • a paid internship ($9/hr, 34 hours, to be exact), happening over the course of three days (no long term commitment that might interrupt your summer plans)
  • a chance to meet, mingle, and work with influential people in the industry, a networking opportunity you won’t see very often
  • an opportunity to significantly improve your resume with one single job

Here’s the application: MWW Internship Application 2015

Applications are due by April 8. Directions regarding submitting your application are explained on the form.

If you’re not convinced, check out their website, along with this video featuring people from workshops in the past. This is truly a great opportunity. Take advantage of this while you can!

The MWW intern team in 2013: Sarah Hollowell, Ashley Ford, Madison Jones, John Carter, Mo Smith, Rebekah Hobbs, Sara Rust, Jackson Eflin, Kameron McBride, and Kiley Neal.

The MWW intern team in 2013: Sarah Hollowell, Ashley Ford, Madison Jones, John Carter, Mo Smith, Rebekah Hobbs, Sara Rust, Jackson Eflin, Kameron McBride, and Kiley Neal.

 

Are you ready to take the next step?

The Career Center wants you to be ready for all aspects of your job search, so get ahead of the curve by participating in these upcoming events and offerings.

These are for both undergraduate and graduate students in English.

Wednesday and Thursday, February 4 and 5

Résumania

  • 11 a.m. – 2 p.m.
  • Art and Journalism Building Atrium
  • Come have your résumé reviewed by employers and Career Coaches to ensure that you have the very best document you can put forward for an internship or job.

Wednesday, February 11

Cardinal Job Fair

  • 11 a.m. – 3 p.m.
  • Worthen Arena
  • The event brings to campus a wide range of employers that want to connect with students and alumni for internships and full-time employment.
  • Here’s the Employer Guidebook. Check it out!

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Johna Picco: “Don’t go to graduate school without funding,” and other sound advice

Time to tune in, English majors, for another round of excellent advice from Johna Picco. Below, she gives us four amazing tips on graduate school, internships, and Life After The English Major.

Photo provided by Johna Picco.

Photo provided by Johna Picco.

So, what’s up, Johna?

It’s been nearly four years (how?!) since my initial blog post and not only have the years flown by but they’ve also brought about a great deal of change.

Since we last spoke, I’ve left my job at the American Medical Association, applied to and attended graduate school at the University of Illinois, interned at various archives and secured full-time employment (as of October 29th!) as an assistant curator of special collections at The Filson Historical Society.

Yikes. When I write it all out like that, not only does it sound hectic but also ridiculously pretentious. Well, I assure you that it wasn’t all that hectic and that my aim for this post is definitely not to boast about myself but rather share my latest experiences on where an English degree can lead.

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Kelly Stacy Blogs About His Experience in the New York Arts Program!

Last year, English creative writing professor Cathy Day introduced the New York Arts Program to a small group of her past students. Although Ball State University and the NYAP were not officially partnered, the two institutions worked together to allow one student into the program which sends students to live and intern in New York City for one semester. In exchange, the student gains 16 credit hours for his/her respective school. This past spring, Ball State alumnus Kelly Stacy was accepted into the internship program through which he interned at two poetry institutions. Below, Kelly recounts his experience in New York City and discusses the value of such a unique program. Additionally, before continuing to Kelly’s post, be sure to see the flyer below for upcoming informational meetings about the NYAP, which is now officially partnered with Ball State University!

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Apply For Dr. Rai Peterson’s Immersive Learning Course at the Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library

 

A new Provost’s Immersive Seminar has just been added to the Spring/Summer schedule: Internship at the Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library

This is a 12-hour course, requiring registration in two 400-level English courses and two 400-level marketing courses; all prerequisites will be waived for students accepted to this seminar. Students will read 13 books by Kurt Vonnegut, a biography of the author, and a collection of critical essays about his work.  Each student will participate in collaboratively writing a 5-year marketing plan for the Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library and will be assigned to one of the following working groups:

  • Archival research and digital humanities database development
  • Film archive and oral history filming project
  • Product design for the KVML gift shop
  • Traveling museum design and fabrication

Students will be mentored by English and marketing faculty as well as Community Partners including the Indianapolis Museum of Art; the Indianapolis Historical Society; WFYI Television; Creative Street Media Group; Floyd and Stanich, Inc.; Eye on Art; Seven Stories Press; Hamilton Exhibits; and Lilly Library, IU, Bloomington.

Sorry but only students who are able to take two English and two marketing courses during both Spring and Summer semesters in 2012 need apply.  Applications are available from Dr. Rai Peterson, Department of English: rai@bsu.edu

The Washington Center

Photo courtesy of TWC.edu

I recently attended an information session on The Washington Center, organized by Dr. Barbara Stedman, Director of National and International Scholarships and Honors Fellow. I am grateful to Dr. Stedman for the chance to learn about TWC, and most importantly, to pass the information on to others who may benefit from TWC’s programs, which have the potential to be nothing short of life changing.

As TWC puts it, “Leaders are built from the inside out. They’re made, not born.” TWC is a nonprofit academic internship program based out of Washington, D.C. that offers internship programs, as well as academic courses and seminars. TWC mainly functions to connect college students with civic, governmental, and business leaders. They work with hundreds of colleges and universities, a considerable number of public and private host organizations (or internship sites), and over 40,000 alumni.

Here is the list of TWC’s main internship programs:

  • Advocacy, Service, and Arts
  • Business and Management
  • Cordova/Fernos Congressional Internship
  • Ford Motor Company Global Scholars
  • Global Trade and Regional
  • International Affairs
  • Law and Criminal Justice
  • Media and Communication
  • Political Leadership
  • Science, Technology and Society

Because they are located in Washington, D.C., TWC has contacts in nearly every U.S. government organization in the area, as well as contacts beyond the governmental realm. One program I believe could yield experiences particularly useful to English majors is their Media and Communication Program, which includes the fields of communication, print and broadcast journalism, public relations, advertising, and social media.

Social media, in particular, is a field businesses and organizations are especially looking for people to handle. It has become public knowledge that social media can be a great source for advertising, and is gaining more interest every day. Many business owners do not know much about managing social media, but have been paying attention to such trends. Since younger people tend to have more of a beat on this arena, this is who these business owners are going to in order to get a leg up when it comes to their reach, and activity, on the internet.

Here is a short sample list of organizations TWC connects interns with:

  • White House Office of Media Affairs
  • National Public Radio
  • CNN
  • Peace Corps
  • Bread for the World Institute
  • The Smithsonian Institution
  • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
  • U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs
  • Center for Public Integrity
  • CBS News
  • Women for Women International
  • Fair Trade Federation

Internships are a great way to not only prepare for careers in the real world, but also help to learn how to effectively apply for jobs. If you pursue and internship with TWC, you will be required to create a portfolio, including the following elements:

  • Résumé and cover letter
  • Individual development plan
  • Internship defense letter
  • Analyses of selected lectures
  • Civic engagement project reflection
  • Informational interview and other writing or work assignments specific to your program

As I believe we have shown with our “Life After the English Major” posts, ALL career tracks are in need of good writers, or effective communicators, and so each internship is a viable opportunity for an English major. The great reward of internships is the firsthand work experience it provides, something 45% of employers look for when hiring. I think the worth of the internships TWC offers is made obvious by the list of organizations it works with. For more information on TWC, feel free to visit their website here, or email them at info@twc.edu. A brochure will be available in RB 295 as well. We will always strive to connect students with opportunities such as those TWC provides, so keep watching, BSU!

Signed,

Jeremy Bauer

Guest Post: Sam Edwards on her internships at the Statehouse and Sarabande Books, Inc.

Sam Edwards (left)

To not be waiting tables anymore.  When State Auditor Tim Berry spoke to my intern class mere weeks ago, he began impromptu crowd-picking—‘Why did you do this internship??’ (Yes, with two question marks).  This was going to be my answer: to not be waiting tables anymore.  Despite my ambitious peers’ responses about their burning passion to know state government better and their devotion for politics, I was ready to be honest.  Lucky for the other interns (and probably more lucky for me), Auditor Berry never picked me.  However, I was picked for this internship out of a very large pool of political science, criminal justice, and international relations majors.  And yet, I majored in English.

The internship’s official title is Legislative Intern.  Since the beginning of 2011, I spend five days a week inside of that luminous building in front of Lucas Oil Stadium called the Statehouse.  I work for two senators, assisting with everything from constituent correspondence (via e-mail, letters, and phone calls), to committee coverage, to racing my senator’s computer from one marble-tiled floor to another.  You see, I had no particular political ambitions, to say the least.  But now that I find myself here—in a fine-looking suit—I’m entirely enamored with it.  And I know my writing background, including all the effort I put into it during my four-year stay at Hotel Ball State, had everything to do with why I have this internship.

My specialty was Creative Writing, but I spent just as much time and probably more passion on my literature classes.  Thus, by graduation in May of last year, I had done every type of writing imaginable, and it has truly paid off.  My present job requires me to be able to understand and utilize each type of writing I learned at Ball State.  I write thank you letters, letters of recommendation, letters of support for other bills, letters to constituents on smoking ban bills, taxes in Illinois, education reform, and on and on.  The Legislative Assistant that I work directly under is thrilled that I am writing-savvy.  She no longer checks my letters, but passes them right on for senator approval.  I have seen through this experience that not everyone speaks the delicate language of writing, yet it is oh-so-valued.

In the bigger picture, I know this is a lasting love affair with my English major.  I will be returning to my roots in the fall with an internship at Sarabande Books, Inc., a small independent publishing press in Louisville, KY.  After that, I want to continue to be a nomad, wandering different avenues of careers and locations.  I am quite confident (perhaps, partly because I’m still wearing my awesome suit) that my English major will take me wherever I want to go next.  There will always be employers who need skilled writers to communicate their awesomeness to the public/clients.  Erego, a job.

Allow yourself to be swept away by the major.  You won’t regret it.

*Sam Edwards is our second alumnus to receive an internship from Sarabande Books, Inc. Check out alumnus Evan Himelick’s post on his experience with the press here.