Tag Archives: Immersive Learning

Jacket Copy: The People Behind #bsuenglish

An Interview with Amanda Kavars

So, what is Jacket Copy?

Well, it’s an immersive learning class, and it’s a marketing internship. It’s about learning the workflow of an organization and working in teams. You don’t just study principles and strategies of communication–you actually apply them in real time.

Continue reading

5 Ways English Prepares You For A Dream Job

By: Maggie Sutton

You can do almost anything with a degree in English. Our alumni agree. The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) agrees. Even Google agrees. Employers want the skills and experiences English majors have in spades.

So, what do you need to do to prepare for the “real world”?

1.Write Well

Employers want to hire skillful writers. NACE’s second most valued skill was written communication.

English classes help to polish written communication skills, so remember that when you’re buried in essay deadlines!

Continue reading

Immersive Opportunities: Gain Hands-On Experience!

Are you wondering how you can get more involved in the department? Do you want to spice up your class schedule next year? Consider one of our many immersive learning classes! Immersive learning courses provide students with hands-on, real-world experience in their field of interest.

Previous courses have included Storytelling and Social Justice, where students published a book of true stories from community members to make poverty in Delaware County more visible, and Creative Writing in the Community, where students taught writing techniques to young writers in Muncie and published a collaborative anthology.

Fall 2018 English Immersive Learning Courses:

ENG 400: Book Arts Collaborative

This community letterpress and book bindery is located in the MadJax Building in downtown Muncie. Students learn to set type and hand-bind books, and each has the opportunity to become a student manager, where they’ll learn the ins and outs of business through collaboration with community partners. To learn more, contact Prof. Rai Peterson at rai@bsu.edu.

ENG 299X: Jacket Copy Creative

Students staff this in-house marketing agency for the English Department. They manage the department’s social media accounts, blog, and annual newsletter. Students learn storytelling strategies through practices in public relations, graphic design, editing, content marketing, and more. To learn more, contact Prof. Cathy Day at cday@bsu.edu.

ENG 489: The Broken Plate

In this class, students learn firsthand the editing and publishing world, as they produce this nationally distributed literary magazine. Students field submissions in poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, screenwriting, art, and photography, and the journal is released at the annual In Print Festival of First Books. To learn more, contact Prof. Silas Hansen at schansen@bsu.edu.

ENG 400: Digital Literature Review

Students read deeply in literature, theory, and criticism on a vital topic, then produce a volume of this scholarly journal on that topic. Next year’s topic is Brave New Worlds: Utopias and Dystopias in Literature and Film. To learn more, contact Prof. Vanessa Rapatz at vlrapatz@bsu.edu.

ENG 299X: Rethinking Children’s and Young Adult Literature

Students will focus on rethinking characters in children’s and young adult literature to help shift the stigma associated with being disabled. The course culminates in the production of a comprehensive magazine/website containing resources on literature featuring disabled characters and fiction and non-fiction pieces co-created by students at BSU and the Burris Laboratory School. To learn more, contact Prof. Lyn Jones at ljones2@bsu.edu.

 

Immerse yourself

by Erin Moreno

Registration for Spring 2018 is almost here, and I want to tell you why you really, really need to sign up for an immersive-learning class.

ORIGIN STORY

My sophomore year,  I signed up for a 15-credit hour immersive-learning experience taught by a Religious Studies faculty member. I was an English Education major, and until then, I’d been following the path that my freshman advisor had laid out for me.

In order to get into the class, I had to apply and be accepted, and then meet with the department heads of English, Education, and Sociology (my minor) to figure out how the experience could be applied toward the classes I needed to graduate. A bunch of meetings later, I was heading to the Virginia Ball Center for the Representing Religion in Comics seminar.

BEGINNINGS

That semester was one of the most formative experiences of my collegiate career. I collaborated and learned from 12 other students from different disciplines (Religious Studies, Biology, Creative Writing, Fine Arts, Animation) as well as our faculty advisor who really let us lead the class ourselves. We gained experience and skills in leadership, creative writing, art, and technology (I created and drew my entire comic by teaching myself Adobe Photoshop).

Continue reading

Patrick Collier on "Everyday Life in Middletown"

In this interview, #bsuenglish professor Patrick Collier discusses his Virginia Ball Center seminar “Everyday Life in Middletown.”

streetviewold

What did the project entail?

These Virginia Ball seminars are semester-long projects where students get up to 15 credits for their participation, the teacher gets a fellowship, and that gets him or her out of teaching responsibility or any other responsibility on campus. The subject of the seminar was “Everyday Life in Middletown.” Middletown, I assume you know, is Muncie. There’s this history of Muncie being referred to as Middletown since the ’20s when the Lynds did their sociological study in Muncie and it became a national best-seller.

Continue reading

English 444 Blank Book Sale: December 3rd and 5th

Sustainability is an important goal of immersive learning courses.  Preferably, immersive projects can continue to run as part of the standard curriculum.  The department of English has several sustained immersive learning projects, including the Broken Plate literary journal, Creative Writing in the Community, and Book Binding, which is one section of the capstone course, English 444, as taught by Dr. Rai Peterson.

The book binding course teaches students to hand-sew signatures and text blocks and to bind them as books, using a variety of binding methods such as Belgian, case-book, carousel, Coptic, Japanese stab, pamphlet stitch, and others.  Students in the course write researched, original text (which might vary from an in-depth, researched thesis to an introduction followed by a collection of original poetry or prose), and each student brings out a hand-bound edition of four copies of her work.

Continue reading

Dr. Rai Peterson Invites You to Come Celebrate her Students’ Work on the Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library Immersive Learning Project

Our immersive learning project with the Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library will debut its traveling exhibit, which incorporates content from our manuscript and film teams, in Bracken Library on July 9 at 2:00 p.m.  All of the students will be on hand to answer questions and talk about how they researched and made these exhibits and marketing plans and products for the KVML.

Our project has maintained high academic integrity because we have told our students that, since it is funded through the office of the Chief Academic Officer at Ball State, that the administration cares about the integrity, accuracy, and research behind every fragment of it.  We hope that you will stop by, ask questions, and thank these students for the very hard work they have done.  Each understands that there cannot be any “C” work in an immersive project, and while the Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library is their ostensible client, increasing the good name of Ball State was always their ultimate goal.

It is hard to drum up audience on campus in the summer, but we turn over the products to the KVML on July 19, and we wanted this exhibit to open first on our own campus where the professors and friends whose opinions we value most could see it first.

Thank you,
Rai

Ball State’s Immersive Learning Seminar at the Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library Gains National Attention

Last semester, English professor Dr. Rai Peterson called for students from various disciplines across the university student body to assist her in a 33-week immersive learning seminar (to see our original post on this seminar, click here). Her project seeks to reshape and expand the reach of the Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library in Indianapolis via several approaches, including new marketing, expanded advertising, and the preservation of original and rare Vonnegut artifacts. At this point in the semester, the seminar has set its sights on collecting and digitizing many Vonnegut artifacts, and these efforts have begun to gain national attention. The latest example is  from “The Digital Shift,” an extension of Library Journal, which discusses the seminar’s intentions to bring rare and unique documents such as Vonnegut’s letters and manuscripts to the library in digital form. This article, entitled, “Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library Tackling Digitation,” also describes some of the future plans of Dr. Peterson and her student interns, which include a film project and “mobile library.” Continue below to read a short blurb from Dr. Peterson and click the link to view the full article from “The Digital Shift.”

Our seminar students will be creating digital manuscript and film/audio archives, re-designing gift shop products, and building a traveling museum for the Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library.  Because of great publicity like this, we are already receiving requests for the products of our seminar, and we’ve only just begun.  Stay tuned because we have big things to unveil as our seven month-long project unfolds. Click the link below to view the full article from “The Digital Shift.”

“Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library Tackling Digitation,” from “The Digital Shift:” http://bit.ly/tUidZD

Immersive Learning: Tyler Fields Recounts His VBC Experience

An example of a roadside cross on I-69.

Immersive learning. As Ball State students, or even local residents, it is difficult to have not encountered this phrase floating around in our daily lives: it’s everywhere from billboards to the university website. Unfortunately, I believe that a true understanding of the philosophy behind this phrase eludes many of us. Students and parents are told that Ball State is unique because of its commitment to immersive learning. We are told that we will be hard pressed to find other comparable universities that have this dedication to immersive learning. Where this might be an effective marketing strategy, the simple, and even unfortunate, truth remains that until the immersive learning approach is experienced first hand, its true benefits cannot be measured. And make no mistake that when I say “benefits,” I truly believe that immersive learning positions students (and even instructors on some level) to examine their strengths and utilize them in a manner that allows for the greatest amount of potential. Continue reading