Tag Archives: Elisabeth Buck

Writing Project Grant (and more February Good News)

iwp_primary_logo_colorThe Indiana Writing Project directed by Professor Susanna Benko was recently awarded a $20,000 grant for the College Ready Writers Program, sponsored by the National Writing Project. This program focuses on teaching argument writing in middle and secondary classrooms. The grant money will be used to invest in 12-16 experienced middle and high school Writing Project teacher-leaders. These teachers will engage in extensive professional development studying argument writing through the summer of 2017 and the 2017-2018 school year. Congratulations!

On Thursday March 2, Prof. Cathy Day will be reading from her work at Franklin CollegeOn Saturday, March 25, she will be speaking on “Getting the Most out of Your Writing Life” at the Antioch Writers Workshop. In June, she’ll be traveling to the 2017 NonfictioNow conference in Iceland, speaking on a panel about “Obsession in Nonfiction.”

The English Department’s undergraduate ENL license recently received National Recognition.

Prof. Frank Felsenstein and Prof. Jim Connolly were guest speakers at Columbia University’s Book History Colloquium.

Prof. Michael Begnal published an essay on the Chinese Taoist poet Li Po in the new issue (#7) of the Free State Review. Prof. Begnal also presented at this year’s Louisville Conference on Literature and Culture since 1900, on February 23. His paper was titled “Modernist Mythologies and the Poets of Santa Fe in the 1920s.”

Prof. Mary Lou Vercellotti had four submissions,”Research Faculty Fellow,” “Taking Steps to Control Variables in a Quantitative Quasi-Experiment,” “Interdepartmental Faculty Collaboration,” and”Building Institutional Support for SoTL” accepted into a new book on the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL), It Works for Me with SoTL, edited by Hal Blythe, Charlie Sweet, and Russell Carpenter. The goal of the book is to give interested teachers information about the scholarship of teaching and learning (researching the practice of teaching.) The book will be released this fall.

Prof. G. Patterson was invited to be the keynote speaker for Miami University Hamilton’s Women’s History Month event. The talk is called, “Don’t Despair. Organize: Activist Feminisms and Intersectional Futures.” They will be giving the keynote on Monday, March 6. The event is open to the public.

Prof. Joyce Huff  will be inducted as an alumni member of Phi Beta Kappa by St. Mary’s College of Maryland in recognition of her scholarly achievements since graduating.

Prof. Rani Crowe‘s short film Beautiful Eyes was screened in Berlin at the Final Girls Film Festival, a women’s horror festival.

Prof. Molly Ferguson‘s article, “Clowning as Human Rights Activism in Recent Devised Irish Theatre” was accepted for publication in the 2017 “Resistance in Modern Ireland” issue of Studi Irlandesi: A Journal of Irish Studies.

Prof. Jennifer Grouling‘s and Ph.D student Elisabeth Buck’s article, “Colleagues, Classmates, and Friends: Graduate v. Undergraduate Tutor Identities and Professionalization” will be published in Praxis: A Writing Center Journal in their May 2017 edition.

Elisabeth Buck Interviews Evan Neace, Winner of the Ball State Writing Program Contest

In a post earlier this year, we announced the Writing Program Contest winners. The Ball State Writing Program hosts a writing contest each semester to promote the best student writing. Any project composed for a Writing Program course (ENG 101/102, ENG 103, ENG 104, or ENG 114) is eligible for the contest.  Winning submissions not only receive monetary prizes but also are published in a future edition of BallPoint, Ball State’s writing handbook. Recently, Elisabeth Buck, Writing Program Graduate Assistant Director, interviewed Evan Neace, a Fall 2012 Writing Program Contest Winner. Read below to find out about more Evan and his growth as a writer.

*Photo provided by Evan Neace

*Photo provided by Evan Neace

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Call For Papers for Practical Criticism Midwest 2013!

Practical Criticism Midwest is the annual conference held by and for English department graduate students.  In the following post, PCM planning committee member Elisabeth Buck encourages all department graduate students to participate and announces the call for papers as well as a workshop to help graduate students write proposals to conference presentations.

The opportunity to participate in and attend academic conferences is one of the most exciting aspects of graduate student life. Some of the perks of attendance include the prospect of hobnobbing with prominent scholars and totally nerding out with fellow academics in your field. If you’re lucky, you might even get to explore a cool city in the process. That said, presenting at a conference can also be quite intimidating: say, for instance, you’re put on a panel with a fully tenured professor and a faculty emeritus from Harvard. Or, you get a question from an overly “enthusiastic” audience member who decides to bring up an article that you’ve never heard of before, but that supposedly completely contradicts your entire argument. I might (ahem) be speaking from personal experience here in referencing these two anecdotes, but— awkward / daunting circumstances aside—I can honestly say that my participation in conferences thus far has been an invaluable component of my scholarly and professional development.

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