Tag Archives: Elisabeth Buck

Writing Project Grant (and more February Good News)

iwp_primary_logo_colorThe Indiana Writing Project directed by Professor Susanna Benko was recently awarded a $20,000 grant for the College Ready Writers Program, sponsored by the National Writing Project. This program focuses on teaching argument writing in middle and secondary classrooms. The grant money will be used to invest in 12-16 experienced middle and high school Writing Project teacher-leaders. These teachers will engage in extensive professional development studying argument writing through the summer of 2017 and the 2017-2018 school year. Congratulations!

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Elisabeth Buck Interviews Evan Neace, Winner of the Ball State Writing Program Contest

In a post earlier this year, we announced the Writing Program Contest winners. The Ball State Writing Program hosts a writing contest each semester to promote the best student writing. Any project composed for a Writing Program course (ENG 101/102, ENG 103, ENG 104, or ENG 114) is eligible for the contest.  Winning submissions not only receive monetary prizes but also are published in a future edition of BallPoint, Ball State’s writing handbook. Recently, Elisabeth Buck, Writing Program Graduate Assistant Director, interviewed Evan Neace, a Fall 2012 Writing Program Contest Winner. Read below to find out about more Evan and his growth as a writer.

*Photo provided by Evan Neace

*Photo provided by Evan Neace

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Call For Papers for Practical Criticism Midwest 2013!

Practical Criticism Midwest is the annual conference held by and for English department graduate students.  In the following post, PCM planning committee member Elisabeth Buck encourages all department graduate students to participate and announces the call for papers as well as a workshop to help graduate students write proposals to conference presentations.

The opportunity to participate in and attend academic conferences is one of the most exciting aspects of graduate student life. Some of the perks of attendance include the prospect of hobnobbing with prominent scholars and totally nerding out with fellow academics in your field. If you’re lucky, you might even get to explore a cool city in the process. That said, presenting at a conference can also be quite intimidating: say, for instance, you’re put on a panel with a fully tenured professor and a faculty emeritus from Harvard. Or, you get a question from an overly “enthusiastic” audience member who decides to bring up an article that you’ve never heard of before, but that supposedly completely contradicts your entire argument. I might (ahem) be speaking from personal experience here in referencing these two anecdotes, but— awkward / daunting circumstances aside—I can honestly say that my participation in conferences thus far has been an invaluable component of my scholarly and professional development.

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