Tag Archives: Andrea Wolfe

Rani Crowe's Short Film Featured at Film Festivals (and More September Good News)

The beginning of the semester has been filled with many accomplishments. Read more to learn about the department’s achievements!

Rani Deighe Crowe‘s short film, Texting: A Love Story, played at the Broad Humor Film Festival at the beginning of the month. The film also:Texting: A Love Story

  • Played at the Milwaukee Women’s Film Festival in August, winning the Audience Award for short film
  • Has been accepted to 74 festivals around the world, including screenings in Israel, South Africa, Japan, Greece, Italy, Austria, Germany, and the UK

In October, the film will screen at the Indie Hype Film Festival in Sydney, Australia and the Portland Comedy Film Festival in Portland, Oregon.

In other news…

Dr. Darolyn “Lyn” Jones accepted an invitation to serve as a three year term board member for the Indiana Teachers of Writing (ITW). She also:

  • Presented at the conference “#blacklivesmatter: And So Do Authentic Writing Prompts” at the Indiana Teachers of Writing Annual Conference with Michael Baumann, a Ph. D. in Rhetoric and Composition at the University of Louisville.
  • Spoke with Dr. Sheron Fraser-Burgess at the Indiana Association of Black School Educators (IABSE) Annual Fall Meeting on the topic of “How and why we should create more clubs like the Alliance of Black and Latino Teachers (ABLT) club.”
  • Released her new book “Memory Workshop” with co-author Barbara Shoup

Dr. Adam Beach‘s essay, “Aubin’s The Noble Slaves, Montagu’s Spanish Lady, and English Feminist Writing about Sexual Slavery in the Ottoman World” was accepted for publication in Eighteenth-Century Fiction.

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Good News, February 2015

Amory Orchard mans the Poets-for-Hire desk.

Amory Orchard mans the Poet-for-Hire desk.

In the latest installment of the “Good News” series, BSU English highlights the accomplishments of faculty and students through the month of February.


The Writing Center hosted a two-day fundraiser, “Poets for Hire,” to benefit the Second Harvest Food Bank in Muncie. On February 12 and 13, Ball State students and faculty wrote approximately 75 personalized love poems and took donations as payment. The event raised approximately $230 and two big boxes of food. It was also covered on Indiana Public RadioDavid DiSarro (PhD in Rhetoric and Composition) published his poetry chapbook, “I Used to Play in Bands,” at Finishing Line Press. The title poem was first published in Hawaii Pacific Review, and you can read it here. He’s currently an Assistant Professor of English and the Director of the Writing Center at Endicott College in Beverly, MA. David’s creative work has previously appeared in The Ibbetson Street Magazine, The Orange Room Review, Breadcrumb Scabs, Third Wednesday, among others.

Isabel Vasquez, a junior double major in Spanish and English studies, recently published her reflective essay, “Alive,” in Ivy Tech’s mê tis Volume VII . She also published “The Necessity” in The Mochila Review, a journal from Missouri Western State University, which you can read here.


Do you have any good news? Let us know so we can put it in our alumni newsletter!

Do you have any good news? Let us know so we can put it in our alumni newsletter!


Melissa Hull (Secretary to the Director of the Writing Program) who publishes poetry as “M. Ann Hull” has published quite a few poems since July.  (You know you have a great department when even the staff is producing such quality work!)

  • Blue Earth Review, “The Wife Called it Making Memories
  • BOXCAR Poetry Review, “Images or Shadows of Silent Things”
  • Emrys Journal, “Just Beyond the Reach”
  • The Greensboro Review, “Snow Cover”
  • Heavy Feather Review, “Elegy for a Mason Jar,” “House of Echoes,” and “This Isn’t an Era for Adoring”
  • Passages North, “My Mother, Born in Summer, Had Winter Babies” and “To You, Who Never”
  • Phantom Limb, “Look at Me / Don’t Look at Me”
  • Juked, “Such Similar Fingerprints”
  • Threadcount, “The Last Neglected Child”
  • WomenArts Quarterly Journal, “To Track Tears under the Microscope”

Sarah Hollowell, a senior creative writing major, was interviewed by the Ball State Daily News regarding fat positivity. Sarah recently published her essay, “This is an Essay about a Fat Woman being Loved and Getting Laid,” in The Toast, and it has been shared over 6,000 times through various social media outlets.

Alysha Hoffa’s (B.A. creative writing, 2013) essay, “Colorless Life: An Essay in Grayscale,” was named a Notable Essay in Best American Essays 2014. It was originally published in Southern Indiana Review. Alysha is currently in the MFA program at Fresno State.

Rebecca McNair, a senior creative writing major, was featured in the Ball State Daily News. She’s launching a feminist literary magazine, Andromeda Speaks, a project that was born in her Literary Publishing and Editing course with Professor Silas Hansen. You can contribute to the launch on Kickstarter.

Brett Hiatt (B.S. teaching English language arts) has been teaching in China for a year, and now he’s now the lead teacher. You can read about his experiences here.

Assistant Professor Andrea Wolfe (second from right) was the recipient of an  Immersive Learning Award. (Photo courtesy of Ball State University)

Assistant Professor Andrea Wolfe (second from right) was the recipient of an Immersive Learning Award. (Photo courtesy of Ball State University)

Andrea Powell Wolfe (assistant professor of English) recently won a 2015 Immersive Learning Award for her seminar at the Virginia B. Ball Center for Creative Inquiry in 2013. Wolfe led an interdisciplinary team of 14 students in creating a 35-minute documentary, “Down to Earth: Small Farm Issues in a Big Farm World.

The film follows a local food producer/veterinarian through a week of life on the farm, at the farmer’s market, and on veterinary calls. It aired on WIPB-TV and was screened at film festivals in South Bend and Indianapolis. Community partners included Becker Farms in Mooreland, Indiana, and Muncie’s Living Lightly Fair. You can learn more about Down to Earth here.

Angela Jackson Brown (assistant professor of English) will be co-teaching a session on African-American literature with Hedi Podlasli-Labrenz on February 24th. The session will take place at Ökumenisches Gymnasium zu Bremen in Germany. Hedi’s students will be reading Professor Brown’s novel, Drinking from a Bitter Cupso Brown will also guest lecture there over the summer.

Molly Ferguson (assistant professor of English) received a Start-Up Program award from the Sponsored Projects Administration. She will use her grant money to travel to cities such as Dublin, Cork, Galway, and Belfast to study Irish plays as expressions of shared traumas.


Every year, Ball State’s Graduate School identifies grad students who have exceeded expectations in their respective programs. Since so many students will receive awards this year, we’re going to devote an entire blog post to recognizing them. Stay tuned for next month’s edition of Good News!

Dr. Andrea Wolfe Discusses Her VBC Sustainable Agriculture Seminar

*Photo provided by Andrea Wolfe

*Photo provided by Andrea Wolfe

In the fall semester of 2013, I led a seminar on sustainable agriculture at the Virginia B. Ball Center for Creative Inquiry (VBC).  The main product to emerge from the class was a 25-minute film entitled Down to Earth: Small Farm Issues in a Big Farm World.  The students in the seminar also developed a website containing recipes for foods that are locally available and more than 60 articles meant to serve as supplementary materials to the film.  In addition, they built a four-week curriculum on sustainable agriculture and implemented it in an after-school program for elementary students at the Roy C. Buley Center in Muncie.  I see the seminar as a great success!  The students and I were able to develop informed opinions about the future of farming and food production.  The course also allowed us the opportunity to enter into the current social and political movement toward sustainable agriculture by sharing important information about local foods with community members—and the world—through the film, website, and educational program.

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Dr. Andrea Powell Wolfe Recommends “Room” by Emma Donoghue

This semester we are introducing Recommended Reads, a new segment in which Ball State students and faculty contribute a short review of a recommended piece of literature. Continue below to read our first installment in the series, Dr. Andrea Wolfe’s review of Room by Emma Donoghue. Be sure to check back for a new Recommended Reads post every Friday.

A thrilling and often heart-wrenching page-turner, Emma Donoghue’s Room also serves as a study of the stages of psychosexual development set out by Lacan and revised by later feminist psychoanalytic theorists.  The novel is narrated by Jack, a seemingly contented boy of five who, at the beginning of the story, has never left the single-room apartment that he shares with his mother.  The only person to enter and exit the room is Old Nick, who comes in the night after Jack is supposed to be asleep in the wardrobe where he sleeps.  Ma eventually reveals to Jack that Nick abducted her seven years ago and that she and Jack are his captives.  The two of them implement an escape plan, and the rest of the novel is about their adaptation to the outside world.

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New Faculty Profile: Andrea Wolfe

In continuation with our new faculty profiles, this week the Ball State English Department features Dr. Andrea Wolfe. Continue reading to see Andrea’s interview conducted by English Department intern Nakkia Patrick. Also, be sure to read the previous posts featuring new faculty members Dr. Miranda Nesler, Dr. Maria Windell, Prof. Liz Whiteacre, and Prof. John King.

How did you get interested in 20th century American literature?

I think that I was just interested in doing literature that was contemporary to my culture; the culture that I lived in. I wanted to examine the culture that was around me. I wanted to know my own culture and where I lived.

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