Category Archives: Information

The Inside Scoop on Ball State's Literary Magazine: The Broken Plate

We sat down with Professor Mark Neely, faculty supervisor of The Broken Plate, and Jackson Eflin, a former Broken Plate staff member who has also had his work published in the literary magazine. 

What is The neelyBroken Plate?

The Broken Plate is a literary magazine that publishes poetry, fiction, nonfiction, art, and photography (among other things) by writers and artists from around the world. Each issue is edited by an interdisciplinary group of Ball State undergraduate students and released at our annual In Print Festival of First Books.

You’ve been the editor of the magazine for several years now. How have things changed over time?

When I took over as faculty adviser for the magazine, it was a small operation run by a few student volunteers. They only published the work of Ball State students, mostly that of a small group of friends.

I wanted to make it a more valuable experience for both the editors and for the Ball State writing community, so I used our existing course in Literary Editing and Publishing as a way to professionalize the magazine, and to spread the word more effectively about our submissions process. Eventually, we opened up submissions to all writers, which increased our pool of pieces to choose from, and I think it makes for a more rewarding experience for students.

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Fall Semester is coming up, and we think some of you should drop all of your classes.

By now you should be familiar with all the fantastic work that has come from the Virginia Ball Center. Projects like the Infinite Museum and The Freedom Bus have sparked interest from all kinds of majors, and this fall’s immersive learning opportunity is no different.

Professor Audra Sokol from the Theatre and Dance Department has reached out to BSU English and asked for those English majors who are passionate about both spoken word poetry and the damaging objectification that comes with our culture’s ideal body image. While this project will continue on into the spring semester, it only requires that you dedicate your full schedule for this fall.

In case you don’t know how VBC semesters work: you take this one class, and then appeal to different departments to have the experience “count” for various courses.

We know you’ve already got your fall schedule set. But do not ignore this opportunity! Participating in this project won’t set you back.

Assistant Chairperson Cathy Day says that you can apply this experience for up to two English courses. If you’re curious about this and would like to meet to further discuss this opportunity, schedule an appointment with her through Katie Atkinson at 765-285-8583.

For more information on this immersive learning project, check out the abstract.

Save the Date! Use our calendars!

Fun Fact: the English department at Ball State is as large as small college.

Lots of faculty. Lots of students.

This is great, really, except that it’s hard to know what the heck is going on sometimes.

So, we’ve created new external and internal calendars.

[Bookmark those links!]

  • If you still use a physical, paper-and-pencil calendar, that’s fine. Now, you can take a look at events and decide which ones you want to write down in your personal calendar.
  • If you use a digital calendar, such as Outlook, iCal, or Google calendar, you can manually add any of these events.
  • But if you’d like to hit a button, and boom, have an event be added to your calendar automatically, then you have that option as well.

Here is a screencast that shows you how to add events to your calendar.

Here are some links as well:

How to see your Google Calendar in Outlook

How to sync Outlook and iCal with Google Calendar.

Important: We’d love to see you.

  • If you’re a current student, please use these calendars so we can connect with you.
  • If you’re an alum or former faculty, please use these calendars and come back to an event this year.
  • If you’re a prospective student, please use these calendars to see what kinds of cool things you can attend when you join us in the English department at Ball State.

Important: Share events and experiences at #bsuenglish.

We want to know what you think. Use #bsuenglish when you attend an event, and you could win “Tweet of the Week” and a prize!

Important: No more saying, “I didn’t know about that.”

Use the calendars, people.

Undergraduate Student Morgan Aprill Discusses Her Writing Fellowship and Her Research Project on Tutoring

MorganAprill

Morgan Aprill is an English literature student at Ball State University with minors in Spanish and professional writing. She is entering her senior year as an undergraduate at the university in the fall. In addition to her work on the “Digital Literature Review,” she currently works as a tutor at the English Department Writing Center. She is conducting a research fellowship with two of her professors about tutoring and composition in second languages, with hopes of publishing the findings in a peer-reviewed research journal. She is a recent recipient of the Carol S Chalk Memorial Scholarship awarded to outstanding tutors in the Writing Center.

I was approached by Dr. Kuriscak, one of my previous Spanish professors, and Dr. Grouling, the Director of the Writing Center, at the end of the 12-13 school year. As a Spanish minor, I took Dr. Kuriscak’s Spanish 202 class at the end of my sophomore year. Both professors knew I worked as a tutor in the Writing Center and that I was also in the Honors College, so they thought I was the perfect candidate for the research they were interested in pursuing concerning alternative tutoring methods. Dr. Grouling had been in conversation with Dr. Kuriscak about ways the Center could aid students who were working on writing for their foreign language classes. The professors came up with the idea of trying out a writing fellow who would work with Dr. Kuriscak’s Spanish composition classes. That’s where I came in.

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Interview with Recent Alum Tyler Gobble on Living the Writer’s Life and Winning a Book Award

TGOB

Tyler Gobble graduated from Ball State University in May 2011. He is a multi-hat wearer for Magic Helicopter Press and host of the Everything Is Bigger reading series at Malvern Books in Austin, TX. He has plopped out four chapbooks, with two others called Other People’s Poems (Radioactive Moat) and Collected Feelings with Layne Ransom (Forklift INK) forthcoming, and his first full-length will be out from Coconut Books in the fall of 2014. He likes disc golf, tank tops, and bacon, and yes, in that order. Feel free to mosey a message over to gobble.tyler@gmail.com for whatever reasons.

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Get Ready for In Print 2014 by Reading These Interview Excerpts

The 2014 In Print Festival is coming next week in Assembly Hall at the Alumni Center! On Tuesday, March 18 at 7:30 PM, the visiting authors will read from their work.  The authors, along with editor Jodee Stanley, will also participate in a panel discussion on Wednesday, March 19, at 7:30 PM. By attending the Festival, you will be able to reach out to the writing community and gain insight into life as a writer from experienced authors. To get a taste of who will be speaking at the Festival, take a look at these interview excerpts from the In Print panelists.  Full versions of the interviews can be found in the newest edition of The Broken Plate, which is available for free to all who attend In Print.

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Good News, Fall 2013

In the latest installment of our “Good News” series, The Ball State English Department highlights the accomplishments of the department’s graduate students and faculty during the Fall 2013 semester:

Amit Baishya wrote an article titled “The Act of Watching with One’s One Eyes: ‘Strange Recognitions’ in Siddhartha Deb’s An Outline of the Republic,” which is forthcoming in Interventions: International Journal for Postcolonial Studies. Another article by Baishya titled “The ‘secret killings’ of Assam in literature” was published in November in Himal Southasian. He also has an article named “Close Encounters of the Real Kind: the Avatars of Terror in Two Contemporary Assamese Short Stories” that has been accepted for publication in a collected edition of essays titled Frames of Culture. Routledge will publish the collection in November 2014.

Baishya was also invited to deliver a presentation titled “Countryless Countries: the Poetics of No-Man’s Zones in Contemporary Militant Fictions” at the Materialism and the Colony colloquium at Bard College at Simon’s Rock on May 23, 2013. In addition, he is co-organizing a seminar titled “Differential Capital” at the American Comparative Literature Association Conference at New York University in March 2014.

Doctoral student Nicki Litherland Baker’s article “’Get It off My Stack’: Teachers’ Tools for Grading Papers” is in press, to be published in Assessing Writing. The paper was first presented at the national College English Association Conference in Savannah, Georgia last April. Litherland Baker also presented her paper “Students’ Own Engagement with Technology as Their Research Focus” at the Indiana Teachers of Writing conference held in Noblesville, Indiana in September. In addition, at the Indiana College English Association Conference in Evansville, which took place in October, she presented “College Composition and the Five-Paragraph Essay: An Example of Academic Othering.”

Adam R. Beach co-edited (with Srividhya Swaminathan) Invoking Slavery in the Eighteenth-Century British Imagination, and the book was published by Ashgate in July 2013.  Beach’s essay “The Good-Treatment Debate, Comparative Slave Studies, and the ‘Adventures’ of T.S.,” is included in the volume. Beach also published “African Slaves, English Slave Narratives, and Early Modern Morocco” in Eighteenth Century Studies.

Peter Davis’s third book, TINA, came out from Bloof Books in 2013. It has received good reviews in Fanzine and H_ngm_n. A poem from TINA was featured at Versedaily. He has done a fair amount of readings this semester for TINA, most notably at the KGB reading series, The New School, Manchester University, and Illinois State University. He is doing a workshop and reading at Columbia College in Chicago in February. Davis is also featured in a new anthology, The Incredible Sestina Anthology, which was edited by Daniel Nester.

Cathy Day published a short story, “Mr. Jenny Perdido” in Volume 9 of Pank Magazine in 2013. She also received a grant called “Publishing + BSU Students” that provided funds for 20 students to participate in the 40th annual Midwest Writers Workshop from July 25-27 last summer. It is a Discovery Award Grant given by the Discovery Group of Muncie, Indiana in 2013 for $15,398. Click here to read the department’s blog post about her involvement in the event.

Day also wrote a guest post for the Indiana University Press blog called “The Book Behind the Old Washington Street Festival” on August 30, 2013. She wrote it in an effort to publicize her neighborhood’s annual historical festival and the work of Muncie author Emily Kimbrough.

Frank Felsenstein is the joint author (with John Straw, Katharine Leigh, and James Connolly) of “Reading Library Records: Constructing and Using the What Middletown Read Database,” which has appeared as a chapter in Libraries and the Reading Public in Twentieth-Century America, published by the University of Wisconsin Press in 2013. The chapter is based on a team presentation at the 2010 conference, “Libraries in the History of Print Culture,” which is sponsored every five years by the American Library Association. Given the rarity of their survival, the editors of the volume describe the discovery of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century circulation records of the Muncie Public Library as “an extraordinary find.” Information about the project and digitized records can be accessed through Ball State’s website. The freely accessible database is now being regularly employed both by researchers and by teachers and students across the United States and abroad.

Robert D. Habich published the chapter “Biography” in Ralph Waldo Emerson in Context with Cambridge University Press, as well as the online research guide “Ralph Waldo Emerson” in Oxford Bibliographies in American Literature with Oxford University Press. His review of The Collected Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson, vol. 10, appeared in the New England Quarterly in September, and his review of “Not Altogether Human”: Pantheism and the Dark Nature of the American Renaissance by Richard Hardack was published in the Journal of American History in June. Habich is completing a two-year term as president of the Ralph Waldo Emerson Society.

Darolyn Jones was awarded the Outstanding Proposal Submission at the Diversity and Inclusivity Teaching and Research Symposium at Indiana University Southeast on October 13. She was also awarded the university-wide Excellence in Teaching (EXIT) award for her project “Rethinking Children’s Literature: Reading for Change” at Ball State University in 2013.

Jones’s work with the Indiana Writers Center has been featured on the Ball State University website since October. Also, she was featured in an article titled “TTK: Fight for your Writers” in an online publication for the Arts in Indiana called Sky Blue Window on October 12. A memoir collection she edited along with English department faculty member Liz Whiteacre called Monday Coffee and Other Stories of Mothering Children with Special Needs was released in November.

Sean Lovelace released a flash fiction collection published by Bateau Press titled The Frogs are Incredibly Loud Here. It was the winner of the 2013 Keel Prize for short fiction. Two more of Lovelace’s flash fiction pieces titled “I Roll into a Ball and they Throw me at Derek Jeter” and “Separation” were published in Fall 2013 in Quarter After Eight literary magazine. During the summer of 2013, his flash fiction piece titled “Saturday” was published in Juked magazine.

Craig O’Hara’s short story “The Corner,” which recently appeared in the North Dakota Quarterly, was nominated for a Pushcart Prize.

Emily Scalzo had three poems, “The End of Childhood,” “The Process of Grief,” and “Comfort Food,” featured in the online literary magazine Dead Snakes. Also, her short memoir piece, “Degradation,” was published in the online literary magazine Run to the Roundhouse, Nellie.  Scalzo’s poem, “To Adam,” is forthcoming in February at Deep Water Literary Journal, and two poems, “My Reason for College, 2003,” and “Homeless Man, Purdue University,” are forthcoming in April at Eunoia Review.

Trey Strecker reviewed Evan Dara’s Flee for the TLS: Times Literary Supplement (22 Nov. 2013) and Joseph McElroy’s Cannonball for the Quarterly Conversation 34 (Winter 2014).

Mary Lou Vercellotti’s article “Use and Accuracy of Verb Complement in English L2 Speech” was published in October in the Dutch Journal of Applied Linguistics. Also, she had an article published in TESOL Quarterly titled “Examining the Impact of Self-Correction Notes on Grammatical Accuracy in Speaking” in June. In addition, she wrote a chapter called “Language Acquisition and Language Assessment” in the book The Companion to Language Assessment.

Vercellotti also presented twice at the Second Language Research Forum in Utah this November. Her presentations were titled “Not All Clauses are Created Equal: Classifying Grammatical Complexity in ESL Speech” and “Profiles of Noticing in L2 English Learners: Examining Online and Post-production Noticing Moves.”

Maria Windell’s article titled “Moor, Mulata, Mulatta: Sentimentalism, Racialization, and Benevolent Imperialism in Mary Peabody Mann’s Juanita” has been accepted for publication in J19:The Journal of Nineteenth-Century Americanists, the journal of C19: The Society of Nineteenth-Century Americanists.

Andrea Wolfe completed her Virginia Ball Center seminar entitled “Down to Earth: Small Farm Issues in a Big Farm World” this semester. Take a look at the documentary and other related materials.

English Department Blog on Holiday Hiatus

We would like to wish you all happy holidays and an enjoyable break! We will continue posting on our blog in the spring when classes resume on January 6.  We have a lot of great posts lined up, including “Recommended Reads” posts from Katherine Greene, Todd McKinney, and Jeff Frawley, “New Faculty Profiles” featuring Diane Mooney and Emily Scalzo, and our “Good News” from the Fall 2013 semester.

First Friday Series: Tammy Conard-Salvo Discusses the The Purdue OWL

Ball State University’s Writing Program is excited to announce November’s First Friday Series speaker, Tammy Conard-Salvo, associate director of the Purdue Writing Lab who will present “The Purdue OWL and the Land Grant Mission: Uncovering Invisible Innovation and Research” on November 1 at 1:00 PM in Carmichael Hall 203.

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