Monthly Archives: October 2016

"The View from Middletown": The Importance of Gary Younge's Research

BSU English would like to invite you to a talk given by Gary Younge. The event will take place on Thursday, Nov. 3 at 7:30 pm in 104 Bracken. Copies of Mr. Younge’s book will be available for purchase, and he will be holding a book signing at the event. 

youngeGary Younge is a British journalist and an editor-at-large for The Guardian. He is covering the U.S. election from Muncie in a series of articles called “The View from Middletown.”  Mr. Younge has also made several radio and television documentaries on subjects ranging from the tea party to hip hop culture.

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Meet New #bsuenglish Faculty Member Aimee Taylor!

Aimee Taylor earned her Bachelor’s in English at Shawnee State University in Portsmouth, Ohio. She went on to complete her Master’s at Marshall University in West Virginia, and she is currently working on her dissertation for her PhD in Rhetoric and Writing at Bowling Green State University. This semester, she is teaching ENG 103: Rhetoric and Writing.

Aimee Taylor- Instructor at BSU

How would you describe your perspective on teaching?

I’ve always been a teacher. From a very young age, I related teaching to helping and working with people. I also believe that we all have something inside us that we can teach others, and we can always learn from others. So, with that said, teachers are life-long learners, too. Teaching is my way of making sense of the world.

What is your biggest pet peeve in the classroom, or a big mistake that students tend to make?

I don’t have pet peeves per se, but I try to get students to stop saying “this is a stupid question” or “I’m so dumb” or “nothing I say matters.” It is my job to bring the scholar out of them. I greet them every day as fellow scholars, and instead of “freshmen,” I refer to them as “fresh-scholars.” Repeating that language and encouraging them to make mistakes in the safe space of my classroom begins to change that mindset.

What is a text you think everyone should read?

There is not a single text that I think everyone should read. Read everything! A foundational text in my teaching life, however, is bell hooks’ Teaching to Transgress: Education as the Practice of Freedom.

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Levi Todd Reacts to the Get Loud Poetry Slam

#bsuenglish student and Reacting Out Loud found Levi Todd shares his impression of the Get Loud Poetry Slam, sponsored by the Marilyn K. Cory Speaker Series, that occurred on October 16th at Two Cats Cafe.

Tell us a bit about yourself.

I am a junior English Studies major at Ball State. I enjoy rock climbing, biking, and am waiting for the day I can adopt a pug named Gus.

What is your connection to Reacting Out Loud?

I am the Founder and Executive Director of ROL. Reacting Out Loud is an independent organization devoted to uplifting poetry and affirming community in Muncie, Indiana. We intentionally deliver our programming to Muncie as a whole and are not campus-affiliated, though we did do a one-time collaboration with #bsuenglish at this last event. We firmly believe that poetry is the most accessible form of self-expression that people have, and that it has the potential to build powerful connections within communities.

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Monica Scalf, Owner of The Playground Group

monicascalf.jpgStars to Steer By is our monthly event series focused on helping #bsuenglish students make the best of their degrees after graduation. This month, #bsuenglish alum and owner of The Playground Group Monica Scalf will be presenting “Personal Branding: Uncovering Your Authentic Self” on Wednesday, 10/26 at 6:30 P.M. in Bracken Library 104. Below, Monica shares the career journey that led her to developing The Playground Group.

I studied Secondary Education and English while at Ball State. I also have a Master of Arts in English from Xavier University in Cincinnati, OH. When I first enrolled as a Freshman at BSU, I thought I wanted to major in telecommunications. After my freshman year, I realized I wanted to teach and study English, so I switched my major. I had always loved reading and writing, and this major was a natural fit for me.

I currently run my own corporate consulting and training business, The Playground Group, LLC. It’s called The Playground Group because we teach engaging and interactive workshops in corporate settings that are fun, but not corny. Employees get to “play” and learn at the same time. We specialize in teaching Team Building, Productivity, Personal Branding, and Personal Effectiveness.

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#bsuenglish Remembers Dr. James Ruebel

James Ruebel Honors CollegeMany English Department students and faculty are also affiliated with the Ball State Honors College and were deeply affected by the passing of Dr. James Ruebel, who had been the Dean of the Honors College since 2000.

“I’ve been acquainted with Dr. Ruebel since he arrived at Ball State many years ago,” Professor Elizabeth Dalton remembers. “We’ve worked closely for the past six years working together to teach an integrated humanities class every fall. For four of those six years we also led field studies to Rome and, usually, Florence, Italy. These were two-week field studies where students explored art, architecture, history, and literature of the cities.”

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Drew Miles, a senior Creative Writing major, was one of the students who accompanied Dr. Ruebel on one of the trips to Italy. “My favorite memory of Dr. Ruebel was when he, my friend Katie, his wife Connie, and I ate dinner together at a restaurant in Florence, Italy. We shared very heartwarming conversations and learned a lot about each other’s lives. It was an event I will always treasure,” he says. “Dr. Ruebel taught me in classes throughout my freshman year and took my class on a trip to Italy. He mentored me in several different ways, most importantly in persistence and giving. He was a leader, an altruist, and a friend. He believed in his students and I always felt his support when I faced obstacles in my life.”

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Jennifer Grouling Recommends "The Stormlight Archive" by Brandon Sanderson

“Expectation. That is the true soul of art. If you can give a man more than he expects, then he will laud you his entire life. If you can create an air of anticipation and feed it properly, you will succeed.” (Sanderson, Words of Radiance, p. 1077)

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Brandon Sanderson masters the art of expectation in his series The Stormlight Archive. A planned series of ten books, only the first two are out: The Way of Kings and Words of Radiance. Unlike other fantasy series of their length, these 1000 + page books never feel slow. Even when you have a good idea what’s coming, that sense of expectation and excitement never goes away. Sanderson exceeds expectations with engaging characters, witty dialog, creative world-building, and masterful pacing. It’s a fantasy series you’ll find seriously addictive. I’m already craving re-reading it, and I rarely re-read novels!

One of the best things about The Stormlight Archive is the world-building. Sanderson manages to create an amazing and different world without transgressing into the multiple-page descriptions that can bog down fantasy novels. While keeping common fantasy elements such as magic, high courts, and battles, Sanderson’s world is truly unique and creative. The world is plagued by massive storms. The grass retracts into the earth for protection, the animals are often huge crustaceans, and the humans gather money through gems that are recharged when the storms hit. There are also delightful spren, which are a cross between fairies and the daemons from the His Dark Materials trilogy by Philip Pullman. Sanderson’s spren are a significant part of the world of Roshar. Some seem to be simple atmospheric elements—windspren dart around in a breeze and flamespren dance around the evening fire pit. Others depict human emotion, such as gloryspren and fearspren. There’s even rumored to be intoxicationspren. However, as the story progresses it becomes apparent that spren have a key role in the story, and two of the best characters are intelligent spren who have bonded with main characters.

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Autumn Stars to Steer By Workshops

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Stars to Steer By is an event series hosted by the English Department to help Humanities majors find their way. The next event is October 26th in Bracken 104. 

September’s Stars to Steer By event, hosted in Bracken 104 by Career Coach Eilis Wasserman, was dubbed, “You Don’t Have to be a College Professor to Work at a University.” The panel of Ball State faculty was comprised of  Jim Mitchell, Associate Director of the Career Center, Michael King, Residence Hall Director, Professor Molly Ferguson, who teaches various courses on campus, Brandon Pieczko, Digital Archivist for Manuscript DSC00252.JPGCollections, and Lola Mauer, Associate VP of Annual Giving. They discussed pursuing alternative career tracks in the world of academia. Professor Ferguson represented those who do wish to teach, but the other four speakers discussed their own careers at Ball State that many people do not consider right away. The objective of the night was to show that there are plenty of other opportunities to be explored in a college setting outside of teaching. We will always need professors, but we need plenty of other professions as well.

The next event in the Stars to Steer By series is called, “Personal Branding: Uncovering Your Authentic Self,” and will take place on Wednesday, October 26, 2016 at 6:30 PM in Bracken 104. Ball State University alum Monica Scalf of The Playground Group will be speaking and demonstrating how to create and maintain your professional online presence. Make sure to bring your computers! The workshop will help you work on your professional LinkedIn and Twitter accounts.14519943_1515648545115795_3564882755781426045_n

Meet Professor Rani Crowe!

Assistant Professor Rani Crowe has been making and performing her own work for over twenty years, from stand-up comedy and solo performance art, to multimedia installations and filmmaking. This semester, she is teaching one section of ENG 310: Screenwriting and two sections of ENG 425: Film Studies.

How would you describe your perspective on teaching?

rani-croweThrough watching, reading, discussing, and practical application exercises, I guide students to learn skills and build muscles that build towards a culminating final project where they practically synthesize the skills they have learned. I like to create early non-precious exercises where exploration, risk, and failure are permitted and encouraged in order to learn the process. I try to guide students to be able to articulate their own artistic goals and standards, and help them successfully meet them in their final projects.

When are your office hours?

Monday and Wednesday, 11 AM- 12:30 PM

What are you currently reading, if anything?

Screenplays: I try to read a couple a week. I am always looking for new ways to write them for myself, and good examples I might use for others.

Craft Books: Creating Screenplays That Connect and Adventures in the Screen Trade.

Personal Interest Reading: Another Brooklyn by Jacqueline Woodson and Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi  Coates.

Escapist: I have been enjoying the Jack Reacher novels by Lee Child.

What is a text that you think everyone should read?

Oh, I tend to buy multiple copies of Viktor Frankl’s Man’s Search for Meaning, Rainer Maria Rilke’s Letters to a Young Poet (I have a favorite translation), Yasunari Kawabata’s Palm of the Hand Stories, and a children’s book called The Dot by Peter H. Reynolds that I give away freely as gifts to young artists. I also like Anne Bogart’s A Director Prepares, Peter Brook’s The Empty Space, David Mamet’s Three Uses of the Knife, Anna Deavere Smith’s Letters to a Young Artist, and Matthew Goulish’s 39 Microlectures: In Proximity to Performance. I reference these books often. These are all books that feed me in creative process either with inspiration or example.

What is your biggest pet peeve in the classroom, or a big mistake that students tend to make?

I have two pet peeves:

One is when a student’s goal is merely to please me or get a grade. I want students to have their own critical thoughts, and I want them to have their own goals and agency for the class. They will get more out of it, and I can help them get farther.

Another is if a student starts to struggle (whether they get behind or miss classes due to stress or they have a legitimate crisis), and they compound their situation by not coming to class or not communicating because they feel ashamed or embarrassed or want to avoid the situation. The hole gets bigger. So often, there are resources within the university that can help them, or I can work with them to make accommodations if they communicate early. I want my students to be successful. I am rooting for them. I think most professors are. When the student gets down in that hole and lets it get bigger and bigger, it is harder for us to help them later.

Are you working on any projects at the moment?

I am working on fundraising and pre-production to direct a short film called Finding Grace, written by Screenwriting Faculty, Kathryn Gardiner. We hope to shoot in the spring.

I am working on fundraising and development for a short film I am writing, Heather Has Four Mommies, which was shortlisted for the Kevin Spacey Foundation Grant, but it wasn’t funded, so we are still raising money. We want to shoot in the early summer.

My recent short film, Texting: A Love Story, is winding up its festival circuit time. It still has some screenings left. It has been accepted to 74 festivals around the world, so far. Next, I hope to find an online home for it.

I have a few concepts for features and pilots that I am still developing. (Film is a long process with many phases. It is best to be working on several things at once.)

What are some of your hobbies or interests?

I make jewelry, mostly beaded earrings. I have a cat, a dog, and a rabbit. I love to travel when I can. I speak French. I love theater, performance art, art museums, and other performance or art events. I like to kayak and ride my bike. After managing a fancy restaurant, I like wine and food. I have been doing some work on my house. I read a lot, when I have time. I like many kinds of music.

What is a piece of advice you would offer students?

Love the process. If you are doing it to become a famous writer/filmmaker/actor/musician (whatever), your chances of failure and disappointment increase. If you love the process of making the work, you are more likely to be happy and accumulate work that is actually more likely to lead you to some type of success. It takes time and practice. Patience is something I am still learning, but the accumulation of work does eventually start to manifest results.

Is there anything else you’d like to add about your background, research areas, passions, goals, etc.?

I started as an actor, then I did stand-up comedy, then playwriting, then directing, then performance art, and then filmmaking. They all build off each other and inform each other. I think of myself as an artist first. Whatever content I am working with dictates what medium will best serve it.